• Anglický jazyk

Military history of ancient Egypt

Autor: Source: Wikipedia

Source: Wikipedia. Pages: 81. Chapters: Ancient Egyptian women in warfare, Battles involving ancient Egypt, Nubian women in warfare, Sea Peoples, Wars involving ancient Egypt, Phoenicia, Cleopatra VII, Achaeans, Hatshepsut, Sherden, Berenice II, Cleopatra... Viac o knihe

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Source: Wikipedia. Pages: 81. Chapters: Ancient Egyptian women in warfare, Battles involving ancient Egypt, Nubian women in warfare, Sea Peoples, Wars involving ancient Egypt, Phoenicia, Cleopatra VII, Achaeans, Hatshepsut, Sherden, Berenice II, Cleopatra II of Egypt, Berenice I of Egypt, Ramesses III, Arsinoe III of Egypt, Greco-Persian Wars, Wars of the Delian League, First Persian invasion of Greece, Battle of Kadesh, Military of ancient Egypt, Caphtor, Battle of Megiddo, Arsinoe IV of Egypt, Battle of Pelusium, Ahmose-Nefertari, Ancient Egyptian Navy, Phanes of Halicarnassus, Meshwesh, Tel Dor, Battle of the Delta, Ahhotep I, Battle of Djahy, Amanitore, Alashiya, Tjeker, Battle of Qarqar, Sack of Gezer, Libu, Battle of Carchemish, Khopesh, Sack of Jerusalem, Battle of Bitter Lakes, Siege of Dapur, Fall of Ashdod, Denyen, Lukka lands, Nine bows, Candace of Meroë, Battle of Hama, Meryey, Great Karnak Inscription, Amanishabheto, Majaji, Antiu, Kehek, Beder, Ethiopic War. Excerpt: The Greco-Persian Wars (also often called the Persian Wars) were a series of conflicts between the Achaemenid Empire of Persia and city-states of the Hellenic world that started in 499 BC and lasted until 449 BC. The collision between the fractious political world of the Greeks and the enormous empire of the Persians began when Cyrus the Great conquered Ionia in 547 BC. Struggling to rule the independent-minded cities of Ionia, the Persians appointed tyrants to rule each of them. This would prove to be the source of much trouble for the Greeks and Persians alike. In 499 BC, the then tyrant of Miletus, Aristagoras, embarked on an expedition to conquer the island of Naxos, with Persian support; however, the expedition was a debacle, and pre-empting his dismissal, Aristagoras incited all of Hellenic Asia Minor into rebellion against the Persians. This was the beginning of the Ionian Revolt, which would last until 493 BC, progressively drawing more regions of Asia Minor into the conflict. Aristagoras secured military support from Athens and Eretria, and in 498 BC, these forces helped to capture and burn the Persian regional capital of Sardis. The Persian king Darius the Great vowed to have revenge on Athens and Eretria for this act. The revolt continued, with the two sides effectively stalemated throughout 497-495 BC. In 494 BC, the Persians regrouped, and attacked the epicentre of the revolt in Miletus. At the Battle of Lade, the Ionians suffered a decisive defeat, and the rebellion collapsed, with the final members being stamped out the following year. Seeking to secure his empire from further revolts, and from the interference of the mainland Greeks, Darius embarked on a scheme to conquer Greece, and to punish Athens and Eretria for burning Sardis. The first Persian invasion of Greece began in 492 BC, with the Persian general Mardonius conquering Thrace and Macedon before several mishaps forced an early end to the campaign. In 490 BC a second force was sent to Greece

  • Vydavateľstvo: Books LLC, Reference Series
  • Rok vydania: 2011
  • Formát: Paperback
  • Rozmer: 246 x 189 mm
  • Jazyk: Anglický jazyk
  • ISBN: 9781156534724

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