• Anglický jazyk

Human-powered vehicles

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Source: Wikipedia. Pages: 85. Chapters: Rickshaw, Human-powered transport, Bobsleigh, Luge, Ski, Galley, South Pointing Chariot, Wheelchair, Litter, Baby transport, Shopping cart, Ice boat, Wheelbarrow, Kinetic sculpture race, Rushcart, Kick scooter, Australian... Viac o knihe

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Source: Wikipedia. Pages: 85. Chapters: Rickshaw, Human-powered transport, Bobsleigh, Luge, Ski, Galley, South Pointing Chariot, Wheelchair, Litter, Baby transport, Shopping cart, Ice boat, Wheelbarrow, Kinetic sculpture race, Rushcart, Kick scooter, Australian International Pedal Prix, Handcar, Sledding, Gondola, Bateau, Rickshaws outside Asia, Wok racing, Draisine, Trikke, James River bateau, Powerbocking, Xootr, Omer, Sandolo, Handcycle, Rose-Hulman Human Powered Vehicle Team, Portland Urban Iditarod, Snakeboard, Windsor Pumpkin Regatta, Vigorboard, List of bicycle and human powered vehicle museums, Center for Appropriate Transport, Float tube, Human-powered hydrofoil, Razor, International Human Powered Vehicle Association, Galleass, Dromon, Whymcycle, World Human Powered Vehicle Association, Travois, Shweeb, Pedalo, Baggage cart, Roller racer, Stairclimber, Wheelbench, Bawarij, Waveski, Whirlwind wheelchair, Hobcart, Fantom, Piano trolley, Square scooter, People powered vehicle, Kago. Excerpt: A galley is a ship that is propelled by human oarsmen, used for trade and warfare. Galleys dominated naval warfare in the Mediterranean Sea from the 8th century BC to the development of effective naval gunnery in the 16th century. Galleys fought in the wars of Assyria, ancient Phoenicia, Greece, Carthage and Rome until the 4th century. After the fall of the Roman Empire galleys formed the mainstay of the Byzantine navy and other navies of successors of the Roman Empire, as well as new Muslim navies. Medieval Mediterranean states, notably the Italian maritime republics, including Venice, Pisa, and Genoa, used galleys until the ocean-going man-of-war made them obsolete. The Battle of Lepanto was one of the largest naval battles in which galleys played the principal part. Galleys were in common use until the introduction of broadside sailing ships of war into the Mediterranean in the 17th Century, but continued to be applied minor roles until steam propulsion. The modern term "galley" derives from the medieval Greek ¿a¿¿a galea, originally an oared vessel similar to the Byzantine dromon, though smaller and with only one row of oars. The origin of the Greek word is unclear but could possibly be related to, ¿a¿¿¿¿ galeos, "dog-fish; small shark". It has been attested in English from c. 1300 and present in most European languages from around 1500 as a general term for oared war vessels, especially contemporary types used in the Mediterranean. "Galley" has been used as a term for oared vessels in literature on their development, though the "true" galley is generally considered to be the Mediterranean ships. The distinction is not clear with different writers placing different criteria. Naval historian Richard C. Anderson defined the pre-modern galley in the Mediterranean as a ship that possesses a ram, but also points that this criterion does not hold true in northern Europe. Lionel Casson uses "galley" to describe all North European shipping in the early and high Middle A

  • Vydavateľstvo: Books LLC, Reference Series
  • Rok vydania: 2012
  • Formát: Paperback
  • Rozmer: 246 x 189 mm
  • Jazyk: Anglický jazyk
  • ISBN: 9781157249214

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