• Anglický jazyk

Neolithic Europe

Autor: Source: Wikipedia

Source: Wikipedia. Pages: 79. Chapters: Vinca culture, Old European script, Cucuteni-Trypillian culture, House burning of the Cucuteni-Trypillian culture, Newgrange, Decline and end of the Cucuteni-Trypillian culture, Technology of the Cucuteni-Trypillian... Viac o knihe

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Source: Wikipedia. Pages: 79. Chapters: Vinca culture, Old European script, Cucuteni-Trypillian culture, House burning of the Cucuteni-Trypillian culture, Newgrange, Decline and end of the Cucuteni-Trypillian culture, Technology of the Cucuteni-Trypillian culture, Bilche Zolote, Religion and ritual of the Cucuteni-Trypillian culture, Economy of the Cucuteni-Trypillian culture, Periodization of the Cucuteni-Trypillian culture, Megaliths in Mecklenburg-Vorpommern, Corded Ware culture, Symbols and proto-writing of the Cucuteni-Trypillian culture, Settlements of the Cucuteni-Trypillian culture, Architecture of the Cucuteni-Trypillian culture, Boian culture, Diet of the Cucuteni-Trypillian culture, Neolithic British Isles, Geography of the Cucuteni-Trypillian culture, Vinca-Belo Brdo, Lancken-Granitz dolmens, Tumulus of Bougon, Züschen, Gumelnita-Karanovo culture, Archaeogenetics of the Cucuteni-Trypillian culture, Sieben Steinhäuser, Talianki, Maydanets, Shypyntsi, Battlegore Burial Chamber, Barter tokens of the Cucuteni-Trypillian culture, Gaudo culture, Krzemionki, Hjaltadans, Neolithic long house, Grønsalen, Bonstorf Barrows, Dohnsen-Siddernhausen Dolmen, Fahrenholz, Charlie, Monte d'Accoddi, Hinkelstein culture, Newgrange cursus. Excerpt: The Cucuteni-Trypillian culture, also known as Cucuteni culture (from Romanian), Trypillian culture (from Ukrainian) or Tripolye culture (from Russian), is a late Neolithic archaeological culture which flourished between ca. 5500 BC and 2750 BC, from the Carpathian Mountains to the Dniester and Dnieper regions in modern-day Romania, Moldova, and Ukraine, encompassing an area of more than 35,000 km (13,500 square miles). At its peak the Cucuteni-Trypillian culture built the largest settlements in Neolithic Europe, some of which had populations of up to 15,000 inhabitants. Likewise, their density was very high, with the settlements averagely spaced 3 to 4 kilometers apart. One of the most notable aspects of this culture was that every 60 to 80 years the inhabitants of a settlement would burn their entire village. The reason for the burning of the settlements is a subject of debate among scholars; many of the settlements were reconstructed several times on top of earlier ones, preserving the shape and the orientation of the older buildings. One particular location, the Poduri site (Romania), revealed thirteen habitation levels that were constructed on top of each other over many years. The culture was initially named after the village of Cucuteni in Iasi County, Romania, where the first objects associated with it were discovered. In 1884 the Teodor T. Burada, a scholar from the nearby city of Iasi, visited the tell (a hill or mound formed by long-term human occupation) located next to the village of Cucuteni where he unearthed fragments of pottery and terracotta figurines. After Burada had shown his findings to other academics in Iasi a team, including Burada, the poet Nicolae Beldiceanu and archeologists Grigore Butureanu, Dimitrie C. Butculescu and George Diamandi, decided to carry out further explorations of the site, and subsequently began the first archeological excavations at Cucuteni in the spring of 1885. The findings of this initial work were announced in arti

  • Vydavateľstvo: Books LLC, Reference Series
  • Rok vydania: 2011
  • Formát: Paperback
  • Rozmer: 246 x 189 mm
  • Jazyk: Anglický jazyk
  • ISBN: 9781156685167

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