• Anglický jazyk

Paramilitaries from Northern Ireland

Autor: Source: Wikipedia

Source: Wikipedia. Pages: 70. Chapters: Loyalist Volunteer Force members, Loyalists imprisoned during the Northern Ireland conflict, Ulster Defence Association members, Ulster Volunteer Force members, Johnny Adair, Billy Wright, Robin Jackson, Robert McConnell,... Viac o knihe

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Source: Wikipedia. Pages: 70. Chapters: Loyalist Volunteer Force members, Loyalists imprisoned during the Northern Ireland conflict, Ulster Defence Association members, Ulster Volunteer Force members, Johnny Adair, Billy Wright, Robin Jackson, Robert McConnell, Billy Hanna, Tommy Lyttle, John McMichael, David Ervine, James Craig, Stephen McKeag, Billy McCaughey, Harris Boyle, William Marchant, Michael Stone, Davy Payne, Frankie Curry, Lenny Murphy, Andy Tyrie, Brian Nelson, George Seawright, Joe Bratty, Billy Giles, John Bingham, Shoukri brothers, Torrens Knight, Gusty Spence, William Stobie, William Moore, Mark Haddock, Glenn Barr, Billy Hutchinson, John Murphy, Tommy Herron, John White, Jackie McDonald, Robert Bates, Charles Harding Smith, Ray Smallwoods, Sammy Duddy, Jim Gray, Douglas Hutchinson, Sam McCrory, John Gregg, Bobby McKee, William McGrath, Billy Hull, William James Fulton. Excerpt: Robert John "Robin" Jackson, known as the Jackal (c.1946 - 30 May 1998 was a Ulster loyalist who held the rank of brigadier in the Ulster Volunteer Force (UVF) during the period of violent religious and political conflict in Northern Ireland known as the Troubles. From his home in the small village of Donaghcloney, County Down, located five miles southeast of Lurgan, he is alleged to have organised and committed a series of killings against the Catholic nationalist and republican community, although he was never convicted in connection with any killing and never served any lengthy prison terms. At least 50 killings in Northern Ireland have been attributed to him, according to Stephen Howe in the New Statesman and David McKittrick in his book Lost Lives, whereas the Pat Finucane Centre has linked him to over 100. An article by Paul Foot in Private Eye suggested that Jackson led one of the teams that bombed Dublin on 17 May 1974, killing 26 people, including two infants. RUC Special Patrol Group (SPG) officer John Weir, himself a convicted murderer, also maintained this in a sworn affidavit which was published in 2003 in the Barron Report, which was the findings of an official investigation into the Dublin bombings commissioned by Irish Supreme Court Justice Henry Barron. Journalist Kevin Dowling in the Irish Independent alleged that Jackson had headed the gang that perpetrated the Miami Showband killings which left three members of the Irish cabaret band dead and two wounded. Journalist Joe Tiernan and the Pat Finucane Centre also alleged this as well as his implication in the Dublin bombings. When questioned about the latter, Jackson denied involvement. Jackson was a former member of the Ulster Defence Regiment (UDR), but had been expelled from the regiment for undisclosed reasons. It was stated by Weir, as well as by other people including former British soldier and psychological warfare operative Major Colin Wallace, that he was an RUC Special Branch agent. It was

  • Vydavateľstvo: Books LLC, Reference Series
  • Rok vydania: 2011
  • Formát: Paperback
  • Rozmer: 246 x 189 mm
  • Jazyk: Anglický jazyk
  • ISBN: 9781158228669

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