• Anglický jazyk

Carpathian Ruthenia

Autor: Source: Wikipedia

Source: Wikipedia. Pages: 29. Chapters: Rusyn language, Rusyns, West Ukrainian People's Republic, Lemkos, Carpatho-Ukraine, Ruthenian Catholic Church, Hutsuls, History of the Jews in Carpathian Ruthenia, Military history of Carpathian Ruthenia during World... Viac o knihe

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Source: Wikipedia. Pages: 29. Chapters: Rusyn language, Rusyns, West Ukrainian People's Republic, Lemkos, Carpatho-Ukraine, Ruthenian Catholic Church, Hutsuls, History of the Jews in Carpathian Ruthenia, Military history of Carpathian Ruthenia during World War II, Primeval Beech Forests of the Carpathians, Binczarowa, Lemko Republic, Boyko, Byzantine Catholic Eparchy of Mukacheve, Lemkivshchyna, Ruthenians and Ukrainians in Czechoslovakia, Karoly Hokky, Florynka, Carpatho-Rusyn American, Transcarpathia. Excerpt: Carpathian Ruthenia, (Rusyn and Ukrainian: ¿¿¿¿¿¿¿¿¿¿ ¿¿¿¿, Karpats'ka Rus'; Slovak and Czech: Podkarpatská Rus; Hungarian: ; Romanian: ; Polish: ) is a small region in Eastern Europe, now mostly in western Ukraine's Zakarpattia Oblast (Ukrainian: Zakarpats'ka oblast'), easternmost Slovakia (largely in PreSov kraj and KoSice kraj), Poland's Lemkovyna and Romanian Maramures. In ethnic diversity, it is inhabited by Ukrainian, Rusyn, Lemko, Hungarian, Slovak, Romanian, Bulgarian and Russian populations. It has small Bogomil, Hutsul, Jewish, Romani and Szekler or Csango (ethnic Magyars of the Orthodox Church faith) minorities. The nomenclature of the region depends on geographic perspective and point of view. Thus from a Hungarian, Slovak, Czech perspective the region is described as Sub-Carpathia, (i.e. below the Carpathians) while from a Ukrainian and Russian perspective it is referred to as Trans-Carpathia (on the other side of the Carpathian mountains). The use of Carpathian Ruthenia is an attempt to provide a neutral term. During the region's period of Hungarian rule lasting approximately a thousand years, it was officially referred to by Hungarians as Subcarpathia (Hungarian: ) or North-Eastern Upper Hungary. After the Treaty of Trianon of 1920 and the breakup of Austria-Hungary the region became part of Czechoslovakia under the governorship of Gregory Zatkovich. Until 1938-9 it was referred to for a while as Rusinsko or Karpatske Rusinsko, then mostly as Subcarpathian Rus (Czech and Slovak: Podkarpatská Rus) or Subcarpathian Ukraine (Czech and Slovak: Podkarpatská Ukrajina), and from 1927 as the Subcarpathian Land (Czech: Zeme podkarpatoruská, Slovak: Krajina podkarpatoruská). Alternative, unofficial names used in Czechoslovakia before World War II included Subcarpathia (Czech and Slovak: Podkarpatsko), Transcarpathia (Czech and Slovak: Zakarpatsko), Transcarpathian Ukraine (Czech and Slovak: Zakarpatská Ukrajina), Carpathian Rus/Ruthenia (Czech and Slovak: Karpa

  • Vydavateľstvo: Books LLC, Reference Series
  • Rok vydania: 2011
  • Formát: Paperback
  • Rozmer: 246 x 189 mm
  • Jazyk: Anglický jazyk
  • ISBN: 9781157366751

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